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What to know about vicarious liability

If you are performing tasks for your Missouri employer, the company is generally responsible for your actions. You are generally covered by vicarious liability rules even while making a delivery to a customer or while driving to the bank to make a deposit.

You may still face some liability

Let’s say that you cause a car accident that results in bodily injury and property loss. There is a chance that the cost of the damage exceeds the maximum amount that your policy will pay out. In such a scenario, your insurance company will pay the maximum that it is obligated to per the terms of that policy.

Your employer would then be required to pay the difference between what a victim is owed and what your insurance policy covered. If you are hurt in an accident, it may be possible seek lost wages or other damages by filing a workers compensation claim.

When vicarious liability rules do not apply

Generally speaking, vicarious liability rules do not apply during your commute to or from work. These rules are also not in effect if you choose to run a personal errand after making a delivery or completing another task for your employer. It is also important to note that you may be responsible for covering the cost of repairing your vehicle.

If you are involved in an auto accident, you may be liable for damages incurred by other drivers, passengers or pedestrians. However, you could also be entitle to compensation from another driver or from your employer. An attorney may be able to help you better understand your rights and how the legal process may unfold after an accident. Legal counsel may also talk more about vicarious liability and how it may apply in your accident case.